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Why You Should Learn How to Shoot -- Even If You Don't Own a Gun



Crazy story -- let's take a look at the news coverage to get an overview of what happened:



So we can see that she found the opportunity to take the attacker's own gun when he set it in his lap when trying to start her car:


Before she could process what was going on, one of the males opened the driver’s side door and grabbed her by the shirt, yanking her out of the car. One of the men got into the driver’s seat and attempted to drive away but was not able to get the vehicle into drive. The woman said the car requires a button to be pressed to drive the car. The man had trouble doing so and placed his gun in his lap while he attempted to steal the car. The woman told her friend to run.


The report said a second suspect got into the passenger seat and told the first suspect, “Just go.” The woman noticed the suspect wasn’t holding the gun anymore. The report states that she grabbed it out of his lap and ran. Seconds later, the man tackled her from behind. The report said she tried to get the man off but he was holding her tight. That’s when she turned and shot him.


Surprisingly, this might not be as weird an occurrence as we would guess. Many of the examples we usually see are women who have taken a robber's gun at their work like these two:




We End Up with the Attacker's Weapon in Class


I was seeing this happen over and over again when we were conducting the Defense Against Weapons module for our women's self-defense course.


When we defended ourselves against a weapon, we would find ourselves in possession of it. Students would ask me, "now what do I do with it"? The question demanded an answer, and we started to provide instruction on how to turn the tables on the attacker once you had his weapon.


This approach was supported more during a murderous crime spree in 2006 by Mark Goudeau AKA "the Baseline Killer". I had documented one of his sexual assaults on a pair of sisters -- one of whom was pregnant -- on the old website before it was deleted by a person working on the site.


In this case, the sisters testified they had at least two opportunities to take Goudeau's handgun when he was raping the other sister. But they didn't know how to use it or what to do with it if they did take it.

A Gun is a Tool, Learn How it Works


We took on this approach with our women's self-defense module Weapons For Women (W4W). It's something I would recommend for everyone to do:


  • Get help with a trusted source (family member, friend, gun range program) to see how different guns work.

  • Practice making them safe. This means how to empty the bullets from the gun. It also means how to find and how to manipulate any "safety" levers or features on that model of gun.

  • Practice how to make them ready to fire. This means how to load the bullets into the firearm and how to take any mechanical safeties off of the gun.

  • Take your practice to the next level and get instruction on how to fire these firearms.

  • Get used to the noise, flash, and recoil of the gun. If you take it slow with a trusted instructor or mentor, it's not as scary as you might have been led to believe. If you see the tobacco shop clerk in the video above, it's not even apparent when she discharges the gun into the attacker's shoulder. You'll also notice that the gun shot did not produce the kind of reaction we might be used to seeing in Hollywood movies.

In the Weapons for Women module we also train how to be able to pick up any type of object and use it effectively to strike an attacker. Look for more on this module in the near future to be available online.


If you want to get started now on the road towards your empowerment and self-defense, pick up the book on our first module; Never Defenseless: Empowering Women's Self-Defense on Amazon.


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