• WSDC

Women's Self-Defense: Attacked in Bathroom Stall



You're at the club and a guy follows you into the restroom. You are surprised when he suddenly pushes his way into the bathroom stall. What do you do to defend yourself against this assault?


This is not necessarily an unusual occurrence. Sometimes it's consensual. Sometimes it's not.


We're going to provide the "not consensual" scenario here.


In the above video, Coach Shannon and Coach Ach go through two different attacks to show how we can defend ourself in this cramped and awkward space.


The First Attack


The first scenario in the video shows the defender forced back into the stall onto the toilet. The attacker is not holding her, grabbing her arms, or trying to strangle her.


  1. The defender's defensive kicks are clear to use straightaway -- she doesn't hesitate and begins to use alternating kicks to drive the attacker out.

  2. She continues to call out "NO" over and over to attract attention.


The Second Attack


The second scenario is a bit different. Here, the stall is wider and the attacker forces the defender back into the corner and is pressing against her so she cannot escape.


The defender needs to make room to escape:


  1. She uses a right palm strike to the attacker's chin. It is having little effect.

  2. She repeatedly yells out "NO" to attract attention.

  3. She tries to use a forearm push against his chest to make room, but he's too strong and continues to press her.

  4. Then, the attacker pulls up on one of her legs to drive her to the ground (you can hear Shannon give a short, surprised scream when she's lifted up).

  5. The defender now can use her alternating kicks to drive the attacker back.

  6. Now she has room to escape, but she wisely waits to make sure the attacker is down before she gets up to run. If he did not go down, our defender would keep her feet between her and the attacker and continue to kick.

Targets for Self-Defense


For people new here, you might be surprised that we are not focused on hurting the attacker. We are focused on changing his behavior and getting him to move so we can escape.


Related: He's Drunk: Why Your Self-Defense Cannot Rely on Pain Compliance


Our targets run on a straight line up and down the front of his body -- from his groin up to his eyes:

  • Groin

  • Stomach

  • Solar Plexus

  • Throat

  • Chin

  • Nose

  • Eyes

The progression of techniques Shannon uses here is the same as she uses to escape a closed room when she is pushed up against a wall. She demonstrates these techniques in the Skills and Drills video below:







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